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This website is about Brazilian jiu jitsu (BJJ). I'm a purple belt who started in 2006, teaching and training at Artemis BJJ in Bristol, UK. All content ©2004-2016 Can Sönmez

28 August 2012

28/08/2012 - Gracie Barra Bristol (Entering & Finishing the Triangle)

Class #466
Gracie Barra Bristol, (BJJ), Dónal Carmody, Bristol, UK - 28/08/2012

More work on the triangle tonight, beginning with entries. From guard, grab one of their collars with both hands, then pull them in with both your arms and your legs. As soon as their posture is broken, grip their armpit on that collar side with your opposite hand (so, you'll have a grip over their back). Shrimp out slightly, then you're going to get inside their arm, again on that collar side. If there is some space between their elbow and your side, insert your elbow and hook your hand around their bicep. If not, slide your hand under from the outside, then swim it inside to grab the bicep.

Next, wedge your knee behind, then scrape their arm over your knee, until you can bring your leg through: you want to end up with your knee fairly high. Take hold of their wrist, then swivel your leg around their arm, bringing that leg into their neck. You may need to shrimp out slightly more to help with that motion. Raise up your hips and push their arm across to the neck leg side, then lock that arm in place with your same side elbow.

Hold your shin with your free hand, which also means you push off their hip with your other leg. This will swivel your body round so that you're now looking at their ear. Lock the back of your other leg over the neck leg, pull your toes back and angle out the leg, then squeeze for the finish. Dónal doesn't like to pull on the neck, as this can cause strain: very understandable approach from somebody with long-standing neck issues and a good safety reminder in general. :)

In sparring, we started off with the 'jiu jitsu chess' flow roll. Each person is allowed two moves, then the other person has a go. Even more than a typical flow roll, this allows you to play with techniques you might not normally attempt, as it puts you into unusual positions. For example, I ended up doing a sweep from turtle into a kneebar, which I would never normally do in sparring. Also more messing about with inverted guard, armbars under side control and various techniques that generally aren't part of my game but fun to play with in drills like this.

When that then progressed to free sparring with Dónal, I was mainly concentrating on bracing my arms into his shoulders and hips to prevent him passing. When I had a chance to try and pass, I kept that experimental mindset from the chess drill and ended up pulling the tail of his gi tight against his leg, to see if that would help. It didn't particularly lead to anything, but meh, fun to test out the possibilities. I also briefly had a go at my favoured tripod sweep without much luck.

Next up was a white belt, where I attempted the triangle set-ups we'd learned, but I didn't control his posture properly. I was too loose when switching to the cross choke and then armbar, finally shifting into an omoplata, where I didn't control his back quick enough meaning he could roll out. Still, following him up that did at least mean I could then spin into side control and slide through to mount, which is where we spent the rest of the roll.

I was fiddling with an ezequiel choke, but failed to get it in smoothly. My hand was across, but I didn't think I could finish it without crudely digging into his windpipe, so let go and looked for something else. I should review my notes on the Roger choke at some point, as now that I seem to be getting better at maintaining mount (at least on people around my size), it's time I worked more on those fundamental attacks.

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