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This website is about Brazilian jiu jitsu (BJJ). I'm a purple belt who started in 2006, teaching and training at Artemis BJJ in Bristol, UK. All content ©2004-2016 Can Sönmez

24 June 2016

24/06/2016 - BJJ Globetrotter Camp | Leuven 2016 | Pressure Pass to Mount (Nathan Adamson)

Class #742
BJJ Globetrotter Camp (Sportoase Leuven), Nathan Adamson, Leuven, Belgium, 24/06/2016

A video posted by Can (Jun) (@slideyfoot) on



Nathan believes in standing to open the guard, a good tip. As you step into the guard, he described it as that 'evolution of humans' pic in reverse, getting into a low crouch. Pressure you leg into them, generating so much pressure that they will want to push you away with a foot into your hip. Grab that foot, then twist backwards and yank the foot clear. Immediately twist back in, dropping onto them.

Your elbow on the leg yanking side is by their hip: this is important, to prevent them shrimping away before you can get a solid grip. You then drop to get in a solid cross face, locking your hands into what Xande calls the 'super hold'. Cross your feet, leaning heavily into your cross face.

Use that pressure to help you squeeze your knee across, so that you have knees either side of them. From there, slap your legs down into mount, not giving them a chance to make any space for an escape. As you move through into mount you can use your 'super hold' to lever their arm away.


This idea of always aiming for the mount was another key detail I took from this lesson, which definitely changes how you approach passing. I normally always think about side control, so this was a useful different perspective.

If they have a leg in, steps tight as before, with plenty of pressure. He can't pull the leg back now because it's behind his front leg. Nathan steers them by a collar and hip grip, bringing his leg behind their knee. Keeping those grips, he crushes over to the side (like he's doing a knee slide), jamming his head next to theirs. Grab their wrist to pin that arm, turning your hip in: use that turn to clear their leg out of the way. Your other leg (which was behind their knee) can now slide over, moving into mount.


If you're getting stuck, Nathan suggests backstepping around. That could potentially move straight into a back take.

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