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This website is about Brazilian jiu jitsu (BJJ). I'm a purple belt who started in 2006, teaching and training at Artemis BJJ in Bristol, UK. All content ©2004-2016 Can Sönmez

17 May 2017

17/05/2017 - Teaching | Side Control | Failed kimura into armbar, then into a pressing choke

Teaching #664
Artemis BJJ (MYGYM Bristol), Can Sönmez, Bristol, UK - 17/05/2017

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You've gone for the kimura, they block it. You switch to the armbar instead, but they block that too. Maintain control of their arm, wrapping it to your chest. The thumb of your other hand points down, as you move to grip the collar on the far side of their neck. This is your anchor point for a breadcutter style choke (I use 'pressing choke' instead, I think that's more logical and descriptive).

Drop your elbow by the near side of their neck, making sure your forearm is pressing into the near side of their neck. Avoid crushing the windpipe, a common mistake on this kind of choke (not to say it wouldn't submit somebody, but it's inefficient, plus your training partners prefer being able to talk the next day ;D). If you need more leverage, you can grab their near side collar with your other hand and pull it towards their legs to take out the slack. Finally, you can also push your choking elbow into their head, driving their head towards their opposite shoulder.
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Teaching Notes: This is something Matt H showed me, I presume off this video. Gerbil shows it from technical mount, but I think it is viable off an armbar from side control too. However, I'll need to test this more. Either way, it is not going to work from a kimura, as you're sat on their head and can't reach the neck properly: has to be the armbar, so you have access to the neck. I should try teaching this during mount month some time too, as part of technical mount attacks.

The usual first thing to keep in mind with these kind of chokes is making sure it is a blood choke rather than on the windpipe, which I always emphasise. I try to inject some humour when I can, e.g., "your partner will appreciate being able to talk tomorrow, make sure this is a blood choke," that kind of thing. Yeah I know, not exactly Victoria Wood level, but meh, it doesn't come naturally. :P Even if it is being done correctly, that can still sometimes be a little painful if somebody puts loads of force through into the neck. I think that's ok, as it isn't something that is doing lasting damage like pressure into the windpipe, but at the same time I don't like to encourage anything that's mean. Hard to know exactly where that line is sometimes, but I think "no lasting damage" is probably a fairly good place to draw it.

Also, we had a record turnout of 24 grapplers tonight. Brilliant! Lisa's women class was packed too, with ten people. I'm really pleased at how the club has grown this year! That also means that I had a good indication of how many people the mats can handle. In free sparring, everybody was rolling and there was still some space. I think that the mats can hold at least 30, even more once that bit of building work is done and we recover that top corner edge.

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