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This website is about Brazilian jiu jitsu (BJJ). I'm a brown belt who started in 2006, teaching and training at Artemis BJJ in Bristol, UK. All content ©2004-2022 Can Sönmez

04 July 2022

04/07/2022 - Teaching | Open Guard | Lachlan Giles style guard retention (asymmetric grilled chicken)

Teaching #Evening
Artemis BJJ (Easton Road), Can Sönmez, Bristol, UK -04/07/2022

The guard retention course on Lachlan Giles' submeta.io site has some similarities to what Priit teaches in his grilled chicken system. An important initial difference is that Giles takes an asymmetric approach, with one foot higher on the side that your partner is trying to pass, while your other leg is folded with the heel in tight. This is meant to make it difficult for them to initiate a pass, as you can work your back to putting your foot onto the biceps.

Giles talks at length about why he feels keeping that asymmetric guard with the foot high works well. With the foot high, if they grab it and you push against them, you'll spin with your feet ready to square back up. If the foot is low, when you push your head will move towards them. Giles also notes that if you reach with your leg as they pass, that gives them an opening to grab and move into the space. Keeping it in tight with a high leg means you keep the space closed.

Putting your foot on the biceps rather than the hip is another important element. If you can get them close enough, you want to get both your feet onto the biceps, grabbing a collar to lock that in. To then make it even harder for them to disengage, hook one of your feet behind their arm, preventing them from backing away.

If they try to get around your leg, frame against their shoulder, then cross your foot over (also turning your hips, keeping your leg high) to push against their biceps and square back up. Frame against the nearest shoulder, which will be based on their angle. If they turn towards your torso, it will probably be their far shoulder that is best to push against. If they don't turn towards your torso and instead stay facing your head, their near shoulder may be the one in range of your foot.

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Teaching Notes: I need more practice on this to feel comfortable, but I can merge it with the grilled chicken stuff I've learned from Priit. So, things like if they push legs up lock head and butt to the ground, push them down then sit up. I want to work a load more on the cross over, plus dealing with things like leg drag passes. Combining the approaches would make sense, as it feels like there is plenty of common ground between the two systems.

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