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This website is about Brazilian jiu jitsu (BJJ). I'm a purple belt who started in 2006, teaching and training at Artemis BJJ in Bristol, UK. All content ©2004-2014 Can Sönmez

20 March 2013

20/03/2013 - Jamie Teaches GB Fundamentals on Side Control Escape to the Knees

Class #496
Gracie Barra Bristol, (BJJ), Jamie Horsman, Bristol, UK - 20/03/2013

I was looking forward to seeing what the new instructors would be like, which is the main cool part about Geeza being away. Jamie hasn't taught before, so I also wanted to make sure I was there to support him. He started off with some self defence, as this was a Gracie Barra Fundamentals lesson, taking someone down when they headlock you then moving into an armbar.

The main technique was escaping to the knees from under side control. Jamie uses Geeza's method (which presumably is the official GB method: I haven't watched the DVDs for a while, so can't remember how Feitosa does it). Under side control, cross your hands over your neck, to stop your opponent having much in the way of offensive opportunities. You're then going to shift to the 'knife and seashell', which is another way of saying put a forearm into their neck, cupping their hip with the other hand (I prefer using the forearm on the hip too, but this is a viable alternative).

Bridge into them, then turn to your knees. Geeza and Jamie end up straight on rather than off to the side. Bring your knees up one by one, then go to turtle. Straight on is how I first learned it at RGA, though I find that when I do that I tend to have trouble avoiding them sprawling on me and stuffing the escape. Hence why I teach the Roy Dean method of coming up on the side instead, but that doesn't mean straight on is any less viable, I just have trouble with it. ;)



Sparring was specific from side control. I'm relying too much on grips, which will end up burning out my hands if I'm not careful: I need to try and be less 'grippy' for want of a better word. Next time I'll try just placing my hands there, cupping the shoulder, the armpit etc and see if that works ok.

I focused on digging out their near elbow, along with just maintaining position and staying heavy. With white belts, they tend to get frustrated and start bridging wildly, meaning they get tired, so you can just swing your leg over quickly to mount. However, that's a bad habit, as swinging the leg over is risky: they could snatch half guard, or worse, time their bridge and come up in guard.

So, staying heavy was relatively effective, as I was generally able to hold position. Except with Nick. As normal, he rolled me immediately: the fact he's 105kg to my 65 obviously makes a difference, but still, I need to focus on transitions with bigger guys. I'm always telling people when teaching that side control isn't static, you need to keep moving, but this was a good reminder to do it more myself. :D

Underneath was less succesful. I was able to escape a few times and I think I did ok at conserving my energy, but a number of times after bridging and getting my knee through, I found myself spinning around unable to stop them following me. I need to block them from doing that: perhaps controlling the arm, like I taught yesterday, or simply controlling the knee? Another instance where I don't think I'm following my own advice properly!

I'm also not bridging enough, though that's partly due to my groin injury. I gave the spin out escape a try, where you reach under their body, but that didn't go too well. I also attempted the stiff arm without any success: I think I need to commit more, as I'm possibly giving up on it too early.

On my way off the mats at the end, I was amused by one of the kids watching. He stared straight at me and said "You're the strongest!" Especially entertaining as I was standing next to Nick at the time, who quite clearly takes that title. Unless he meant it in the Brazilian sense, so was in fact telling me I'm using too much strength and my technique sucks? The wisdom of children... ;p

1 comment:

SavageKitsune said...

On my way off the mats at the end, I was amused by one of the kids watching. He stared straight at me and said "You're the strongest!" Especially entertaining as I was standing next to Nick at the time, who quite clearly takes that title. Unless he meant it in the Brazilian sense, so was in fact telling me I'm using too much strength and my technique sucks? The wisdom of children... ;p
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ROFL!