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This website is about Brazilian jiu jitsu (BJJ). I'm a purple belt who started in 2006, teaching and training at Artemis BJJ in Bristol, UK. All content ©2004-2016 Can Sönmez

27 April 2016

27/04/2016 - Teaching | Women's Class | Technical Mount to the Back

Teaching #501
Artemis BJJ (MYGYM Bristol), Can Sönmez, Bristol, UK - 27/04/2016

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Technical mount is useful for maintaining your mount, as per the drill we regularly do where you pull the elbow back up. It also enables you to take the back, with Galvao's method. Simply drop back from technical mount, rolling them over the knee you have near their head. The foot you had by their hip becomes your first hook, so you just need to bring the second hook over. Cut your knee underneath them to help facilitate that back position.

The same kind of motion works as a method of retaking the back if you lose one hook, so it has some versatility. In the context of retaking the back, the time to use this is before they get their shoulders to the mat. They've managed to clear one of your hooks and started bringing their hips over. Before they can get their shoulders to the mat, press your chest into their shoulder and roll them onto their side, in the direction they were escaping. You'll probably need to balance on your shoulder and head to get into the right position.

As they have cleared one of your legs, you should be able to then slide that knee behind their head (you might need to post on an arm, but see if you can do it without releasing your seatbelt grip). Sit back and roll them over your knee, then re-establish your second hook. You can keep doing that from side to side as a drill.
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Teaching Notes: Small class today, so I went through some extra bits and pieces on attacking the back. I like combining the rear naked choke with the armbar, which can then lead into material on the armbar from mount as well as grip breaks. If I ever teach a seminar, this is the kind of thing that might build into a useful sequence. That's a loooong way off though. :)

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