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This website is about Brazilian jiu jitsu (BJJ). I'm a purple belt who started in 2006, teaching and training at Artemis BJJ in Bristol, UK. All content ©2004-2016 Can Sönmez

26 April 2017

26/04/2017 - Teaching | Back | Arm Push and Loop Escape

Teaching #656
Artemis BJJ (MYGYM Bristol), Can Sönmez, Bristol, UK - 26/04/2017

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This is a very simple one, though it's lower percentage. You've been rolled over to the choking arm side. First, grab their arm to create some space and hold off the choke. You're looking for an opportunity to pull their arm over your head. Once you can loop that arm over your head, extend your opposite arm, locking it out straight. Continue turning, bringing your same side elbow down to help turn. You're aiming to spin and end up in their guard.
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Teaching Notes: This is another one from MMA Leech's Ace of Escape instructional that I'm reviewing at the moment. The main reason I wanted to review that was to see if it could add some more back escapes to my repertoire, which it has done admirably. Even better, these aren't escapes that are brand new to me, but rather extra details and refinements of things I already know. This one is ok, but I'm not sure I'd want to put it into the regular rotation. It's difficult to get the arm over the head (hence why Gustavo refers to it as a passive escape).

A few people were adding an extra bit, not just pushing the arm, but bending it around the head kinda like a gift wrap. It isn't recommended to escape this way to the other side, but it is possible as long as you tuck your elbow really tight. The main problem - and it's a big problem - is if you try it on the underhook/non-choking side, there is a risk they can just swivel into an armbar. One of my students has been trying that option, and it's difficult for them to avoid the armbar as you only need to wrangle a small bit of space under the arm to get the position.

I'm not sure I'll teach this again, as it's tough to get, but I'll keep playing with it. I have seen this kind of escape pop up elsewhere: if there was a more reliable way of getting the arm over the head, it would make this far higher percentage.

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