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This website is about Brazilian jiu jitsu (BJJ). I'm a brown belt who started in 2006, teaching and training at Artemis BJJ in Bristol, UK. All content ©2004-2016 Can Sönmez

15 May 2019

15/05/2019 - Teaching | Side Control | Step over triangle from scarf hold

Teaching #864
Artemis BJJ (Easton Road), Can Sönmez, Bristol, UK - 15/05/2019



From scarf hold, there are several attacks you can try on the near arm. Often, that will result with their arm between your legs, whether or not you're successful. From there, you can lift up their far shoulder, using your other hand to grab their head and lift that too. You might also find that they make the mistake of putting their arm between your legs when you're in side control, leading to the same opportunity of a triangle.

Once you have their arm secured, you can then step your leg over, sliding it under the head. Lock your shin behind your other leg, in as tight a triangle lock as possible. If you can't lock your legs, you should at least be able to drive your free knee tight to their shoulder, which might be enough for a similar control (though obviously much weaker as your legs are locked).

Squeezing your legs, tensing your calves and reaching back to pull their elbow towards you might be enough to get the triangle choke. This is possible, but usually, it is difficult, meaning I end up using this as a controlling position to help me attack their far arm. However, if you turn your hips over, then relock your legs in the opposite configuration, there is now a much better chance of locking that triangle.



This variation also opens up a whole chain of submissions. The easiest is to grab their wrist, then slide their arm down your leg for a kimura. Wristlocks are also available on both their arms, along with a kimura on the far arm. It's a low risk position with lots of attacks and control, so well worth trying.
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Teaching Notes: Gripping the elbow as well as the wrist on the kimura against the leg makes sense, takes away that looseness. Speaking of which, I didn't emphasise taking away the space between the legs on the switch, though I don't think it was a big problem (and there was enough material to be getting on with). Still, next time don't forget about that. The hip switch to the other side triangle was definitely where people where having the most trouble.

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